Sign our petition today!

YES! I support raising the minimum legal sale age of tobacco products to 21 years old.

13 + 4 =

Raising the tobacco sale age to 21 is an effective strategy to fight tobacco use and it’s gaining momentum nationwide. To date, 15 states (Arkansas, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, Virginia and Washington) have voted to raise their tobacco sale ages to 21, along with at least 450 cities and counties across the country.

Arizona 21 is an initiative of the American Heart Association to save lives by preventing tobacco use.

Research show that about 95% of smokers start before age 21.  Tobacco isn’t smart at any age, but it is especially addicting to those under 21. About 75% of teen smokers continue into adulthood.  From age 18-21, many smokers transition from experimentation to regular use of cigarettes and other tobacco products like e-cigarettes. The Surgeon General indicates that adolescents can become dependent on nicotine very rapidly and at lower consumption levels than adults.

Arizona kids try smoking for the first time each year

of them become regular smokers each year.

Arizona kids alive now will ultimately die prematurely from smoking if current trends continue.

Raising the Minimum Legal Sale Age from 18 to 21

Frequently Asked Questions:

Why is it okay to take away a right from an adult?

Tobacco 21 isn’t about taking choice away from young adults, it’s about giving them more time to make better choices that will extend their lives and protect their health.

If you can fight and die for our country, why can’t you choose to smoke?

Military leaders recognize the toll tobacco takes on troop readiness and on the military health care system and are actively taking steps to reduce tobacco use in the military. The minimum age of military service does not equal readiness to enlist in a lifetime of nicotine addiction.

I heard the tobacco companies are trying to regulate this themselves?

Tobacco companies admit that increasing the sale age from 18-21 threatens their profits. In fact, a Phillip Morris document stated, ”raising the minimum legal sale age could gut the key young adult market.”

This won’t be effective, kids will still get tobacco.

We know that when the minimum legal drinking age was raised from 18 to 21, within a 6 year period drinking in 18-21 year old
range decreased by 6%, according to the CDC.

Youth in our high schools have friends and classmates that are 18 years and older. These friends are a common source of tobacco products for youth users. By raising the minimum legal sale age to 21 we will help keep tobacco out of our schools.

Why is this needed?

Tobacco companies market in kid-friendly flavors like cotton candy, gummy bear, cherry and watermelon. All very attractive and enticing to youth.

Young people are more sensitive to nicotine’s addictiveness and can become addicted more quickly than adults.

Within 6 months of beginning electronic cigarette use, 30% of youth transition to conventional tobacco products.

Raising the tobacco sale age to 21 is an effective strategy to fight tobacco use and it’s gaining momentum nationwide. To date, 15 states (Arkansas, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, Virginia and Washington) have voted to raise their tobacco sale ages to 21, along with at least 450 cities and counties across the country.

Sign our petition today!

YES! I support raising the minimum legal sale age of tobacco products to 21 years old.

8 + 11 =

Just calling an ordinance or law “Tobacco 21” doesn’t make it effective. Recently the tobacco industry has started supporting phony Tobacco 21 efforts designed to prevent real enforcement. Here are some telltale signs of GOOD T21 legislation:

Reinforces or establishes strong tobacco retail licensing that includes:

  • A self-funding revenue source
  • Annual renewal
  • At least annual inspections
  • Penalties including fines, suspension and potential loss of license for violation of tobacco control laws.
  • Establishes a “floor” of minimum requirements and allows local jurisdictions to do more in regard to tobacco control (no preemption).
  • Does not penalize youth for possession/purchase in most cases.